UK  CANADA  USA  FRANCE
Find a Business :
• Language:     French
 Rates & Charges   Global News   Link to Us   Photo Gallery   Hard Copy Pick Up Locations   Consulates   Associations   Make Payment   Basic Business Listings 
Select Login Type
 Affiliate/Member Reseller
User Name
Password
Business Categories
More...    
Classified Ads
Articles
Community Events
Afro Gold Pages News
More...    
News Letter
Join our Newsletter/email list to receive notification on local and global events, Win tickets, business listings, products and service promotion and much more..
View our Newsletters
View our Testimonials
 
 
News & Events : Africa News : The Graves Are...
The Graves Are Not Yet Full
  Tuesday, April 29, 2008   - The News

The Graves Are Not Yet Full
by Philip Emeagwali
emeagwali.com

Walk with me down memory lane. The time: 1968. In 30 months, one million dead. The setting: a dusty camp in Biafra where survivors waited and hoped for peace. The survivors: Refugees fleeing from the “Dance of Death.” My mentor: One of the refugee camp directors, whom I called “Teacher” out of respect.

“Martin Luther King has been killed,” Teacher said, with a pained voice and vacant eyes. I looked towards Teacher, wondering: “Who is Martin Luther King?” I was a 13-year-old refugee in the west African nation of Nigeria, a land then called Biafra. Martin Luther King. What did that name mean?

Eight out of ten Biafrans were refugees exiled from their own country. Two years earlier, Christian army officers had staged a bloody coup killing Muslim leaders. The Muslims felt the coup was a tribal mutiny of Christian Igbos against their beloved leaders. The aggrieved Muslims went on a killing rampage, chanting: “Igbo, Igbo, Igbo, you are no longer part of Nigeria!” In the days that followed, 50,000 Igbos were killed in street uprisings.

Killing was not new to us in Biafra. I was 13, but I knew much of killing. Widows and orphans were most of the refugees in our camp. They had survived the Igbo “Dance of Death” – a euphemism for the mass executions. One thousand men at gunpoint forced to dance a public dance. Seven hundred were then shot and buried en masse in shallow graves. When told to hurry up and return to his regular duty, one of the murderers said: “The graves are not yet full.”

A few days later, with only the clothes on our backs, we fled from this “Dance of Death.” That was six months before Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated. Teacher and I were eventually conscripted into the Biafran army and sent to the front, two years after our escape.

After the war, Teacher – who had taught me the name of Martin Luther King – was among the one million who had died. I – a child soldier – was one of the fifteen million who survived.

Africa is committing suicide: a two-decade war in Sudan, genocidal killings in Rwanda, scorched-earth conflicts in Ethiopia, Somalia, Uganda, and Liberia. The wars in modern Africa are the largest global-scale loss of life since the establishment of the Atlantic Slave trade, which uprooted and scattered Africa’s sons and daughters across the United States, Jamaica, and Brazil.

Africa’s wars are steering the continent toward a sea of self-destruction so deep that even the greatest horror writers are unable to fathom its depths. So, given our circumstances, Martin Luther King was a name unknown, a dead man among millions, with a message that never reached the shores of Biafra.

Neither did his message reach the ears of “The Black Scorpion,” Benjamin Adekunle, a tough Nigerian army commander, whose credo of ethnic cleansing knew nothing of Martin Luther King Jr.’s movement: “We shoot at everything that moves, and when our forces move into Igbo territory, we even shoot things that do not move.”

As we heed Martin Luther King Jr.’s call, and march together across the world stage, let us never forget that we who have witnessed and survived the injustice of such nonsensical wars are the torchbearers of his legacy of peace for our world, our nation, and our children.

Excerpted from a speech delivered by Philip Emeagwali at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia at the commemoration of the 40th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination. The entire transcript and video is posted at emeagwali.com.

Philip Emeagwali has been called “a father of the Internet” by CNN and TIME, and extolled as “one of the great minds of the Information Age” by former US president Bill Clinton.
« Back
 
 
 Site Google Search
   Find A Person
   Find Referer / Affilate
   Business Ads
 
  Home | Contact Us | Email Products    Affiliate    Business Expo    Our Resellers    Rates    FAQs    Directory    Newspaper Links    Magazine Links    Articles
Privacy Policy    Terms and Conditions    Employment    Links    Classified Ads    Giveaways    Events    Advertise    Site Map   Blog
  Link Exchange  Black Pages  Black Business Listings  African Owned Business  Black Business Directory  Black Owned Business
We Accept :  

Developed By : www.zetdomain.com
Copyright © 2007. All Rights Reserved. Afro Gold Pages , Afrogoldpages.com and Afrogoldpages.ca are all registered trademarks of Rovest International LLC. (United States), Rovest Connect Inc. (Canada), and Rovest Ltd. (UK).
This site is designed to collect personal information. Review our Privacy Policy to learn more about how your information is used.
UPS GeoTrust